1932

Abstract

This review demonstrates that recent contributions by archaeologists to the study of cuisine and cooking present a new addition to the field of anthropology. Archaeologists situate their work historically and contextually by examining cuisines that are culturally constructed. Studying cooking and food preparation helps elucidate relationships among material practices, understandings of taste, identity, power, and meaning in a society. Archaeologists can not only discover specific ingredients in food, but also reconstruct recipes, decipher regional cuisines, ascertain sensory experiences, recover the tools in spatial context, recreate techniques used to prepare food in the past, and overall learn more about the social and cultural contexts of the human experience. This type of investigation is possible because archaeological work uses complementary data to explain social practices and because advances in archaeological methods make accessible previously undetectable data. Experimental archaeology focused on cooking in the past has not only revealed important social information but also captured the imagination of the public. Archaeological research on cooking and cuisine reveals social, political, religious, and economic practices in the past, and it has a unique ability to engage the present with the past through public outreach and solutions to food-related problems.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-102317-045734
2020-10-21
2024-04-18
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/anthro/49/1/annurev-anthro-102317-045734.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-102317-045734&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Literature Cited

  1. Aouizerat T, Gutman I, Paz Y, Maeir AM, Gadot Y et al. 2019. Isolation and characterization of live yeast cells from ancient vessels as a tool in bio-archaeology. mBio 10:e00388–19
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Appadurai A. 1981. Gastro-politics in Hindu South Asia. Am. Ethnol. 8:494–511
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Arthur JW. 2014. Culinary crafts and foods in southwestern Ethiopia: an ethnoarchaeological study of Gamo groundstones and pottery. Afr. Archaeol. Rev. 31:131–68
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Atalay S, Hastorf CA. 2006. Food, meals, and daily activities: food habitus at Neolithic Çatalhöyük. Am. Antiq. 71:283–319
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Atici L. 2014. Food and ethnicity and Kültepe-Kanesh: preliminary zooarchaeological evidence. Current Research at Kultepe-Kanesh: An Interdisciplinary and Integrative Approach to Trade Networks, Internationalism, and Identity L Atici, F Kulakoglu, G Barjamovic, A Fairbairn 195–212 Atlanta: Lockwood Press Am. Sch. Orient. Res.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Barjamovic G, Jurado Gonzalez P, Graham C, Lassen AW, Nasrallah N, Sörensen PM 2019. Food in Ancient Mesopotamia. Cooking the Yale Babylonian culinary recipes. Ancient Mesopotamia Speaks: Highlights from the Yale Babylonian Collection AW Lassen, E Frahm, K Wagensonner 108–25 New Haven, CT: Yale Peabody Mus. Nat. Hist.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Barker A, Venables B, Stevens SM Jr, Seeley KW, Wang P, Wolverton S 2012. An optimized approach for protein residue extraction and identification from ceramics after cooking. J. Archaeol. Method Theory 19:407–39
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Battle-Baptiste W. 2011. Black Feminist Archaeology London/New York: Routledge
  9. Biskowski M. 2017. Staple food preparation at Teotihuacan. Archaeol. Anthropol. Sci. 9:29–38
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Bottéro J. 2004. The Oldest Cuisine in the World: Cooking in Mesopotamia, transl. TL Fagan Chicago: Univ. Chicago Press
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Bouchnik R. 2016. Meat consumption patterns as an ethnic marker in the Late Second Tempe period: comparing the Jerusalem city dump and Qumran assemblages. Bones and Identity: Zooarchaeological Approaches to Reconstructing Social and Cultural Landscapes in Southwest Asia N Marom, R Yeshuran, L Weissbrod, G Bar-Oz Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Bourdieu P. 1977. Outline of a Theory of Practice Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
  13. Braun DP. 1983. Pots as tools. Archaeological Hammers and Theories J Moore, A Keene 107–34 New York: Acad. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Bray TL 2003a. The Archaeology and Politics of Food and Feasting in Early States and Empires New York: Kluwer Acad./Plenum
  15. Bray TL. 2003b. To dine splendidly: imperial pottery, commensal politics, and the Inca state. See Bray 2003a 93–142
  16. Brooks Hedstrom DL. 2017. Monks baking bread and salting fish: an archaeology of Early Monastic ascetic taste. Knowing Bodies, Passionate Souls: Sense Perceptions in Byzantium S Ashbrook Harvey, M Mullett 183–208 Washington, DC: Dumbarton Oaks Res. Libr. Collect.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Brown KA, Brown TA. 2013. Biomolecular archaeology. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 42:159–74
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Brumfiel EM. 1991. Weaving and cooking: women's production in Aztec Mexico. See Gero & Conkey 1991 224–51
  19. Brumfiel EM. 1992. Distinguished Lecture in Archeology: Breaking and entering the ecosystem—gender, class, and faction steal the show. Am. Anthropol. 94:551–67
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Brumfiel EM, Robin C. 2008. Gender, households, and society: an introduction. Archeol. Pap. Am. Anthropol. Assoc. 18:1–16
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Brunache P. 2019. Mainstreaming African diasporic foodways when academia is not enough. Transform. Anthropol. 27:149–63
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Carretero LG, Wollstonecroft M, Fuller DQ 2017. A methodological approach to the study of archaeological cereal meals: a case study at Çatalhöyük East (Turkey). Veg. Hist. Archaeobot. 26:415–32
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Carroll M. 2005. The preparation and consumption of food as a contributing factor towards communal identity in the Roman Army. Limes XIX. Acts of the XIXth International Congress of Roman Frontier Studies Z Visy 363–72 Pécs, Hung: Univ. Pécs Press
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Chase B. 2012. Crafting Harappan cuisine on the Saurashtran frontier of the Indus civilization. See Graff & Rodríguez-Alegría 2012 145–71
  25. Chirikure S. 2016. ‘Ethno’ plus ‘archaeology’: What's in there for Africa(ns)?. World Archaeol 48:693–99
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Clark BJ. 2005. Lived ethnicity: archaeology and identity in Mexicano America. World Archaeol 37:440–52
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Conkey MW, Gero JM. 1991. Tensions, pluralities, and engendering archaeology: an introduction to women and prehistory. See Gero & Conkey 1991 3–30
  28. Conkey MW, Gero JM. 1997. Programme to practice: gender and feminism in archaeology. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 26:411–37
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Cope C. 2003. The butchering patterns of Gamla and Yodefat: beginning the search for kosher practices. Behaviour Behind Bones: The Zooarchaeology of Ritual, Religion, Status and Identity SJ O'Day, WV Neer, A Ervynck 25–33 Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Counihan C. 1999. The Anthropology of Food and Body: Gender, Meaning, and Power New York/London: Routledge
  31. Craig OE, Shillito L-M, Albarella U, Viner-Daniels S, Chan B et al. 2015. Feeding Stonehenge: cuisine and consumption at the Late Neolithic site of Durrington Walls. Antiquity 89:1096–109
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Cramp LJE, Evershed RP, Eckardt H 2011. What was a mortarium used for? Organic residues and cultural change in Iron Age and Roman Britain. Antiquity 85:1339–52
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Croes DR. 2010. Courage and thoughtful scholarship = indigenous archaeology partnerships. Am. Antiq. 75:211–16
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Croucher SK. 2011.. ‘ A concubine is still a slave’: sexual relations and Omani colonial identities in nineteenth-century East Africa. The Archaeology of Colonialism: Intimate Encounters and Sexual Effects BL Voss, EC Casella 67–84 Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Crown PL. 2000. Women's role in changing cuisine. Women and Men in the Prehispanic Southwest: Labor, Power and Prestige PL Crown 221–66 Santa Fe, NM: Sch. Am. Res. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Crown PL. 2014. The archaeology of crafts learning: becoming a potter in the Puebloan southwest. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 43:71–88
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Dawdy SL. 2010. “A wild taste”: food and colonialism in eighteenth-century Louisiana. Ethnohistory 57:389–414
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Deetz KF. 2015. Stolen bodies, edible memories: the influence and function of West African foodways in the early British Atlantic. The Routledge History of Food C Helstosky 113–30 London/New York: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Dennell RW. 1979. Prehistoric diet and nutrition: some food for thought. World Archaeol 11:121–35
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Dietler M. 2001. Theorizing the feast: rituals of consumption, commensal politics, and power in African contexts. See Dietler & Hayden 2001 65–114
  41. Dietler M, Hayden B 2001. Feasts: Archaeological and Ethnographic Perspectives on Food, Politics, and Power Washington, DC/London: Smithson. Inst. Press
  42. Djordjević B. 2016. The manufacture of traditional bread-baking pans: ethnoarchaeology and the safeguarding of intangible heritage. The Intangible Elements of Culture in Ethnoarchaeological Research S Biagetti, F Lugli 313–20 Cham, Switz: Springer Int.
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Dobres M-A. 1999. Technology's links and chaînes: the processual unfolding of technique and technician. The Social Dynamics of Technology: Practice, Politics, and World Views M-A Dobres, CR Hoffman 124–46 Washington, DC: Smithson. Inst. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Evershed RP. 2008. Organic residue analysis in archaeology: the archaeological biomarker revolution. Archaeometry 50:895–924
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Farahani A, Chiou KL, Cuthrell RQ, Harkey A, Morell-Hart S et al. 2017. Exploring culinary practices through GIS modeling at Joya de Ceren, El Salvador. Social Perspectives on Ancient Lives from Paleoethnobotanical Data MP Sayre, M Bruno 101–20 New York: Springer
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Franklin M. 2001. The archaeological dimensions of soul food: interpreting race, culture, and Afro-Virginian identity. Race and the Archaeology of Identity CE Orser Jr 88–249 Salt Lake City: Univ. Utah Press
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Gaillard M-J, Morrisson KD, Whitehouse NJ 2015. Past anthropogenic land use and land cover change at the global scale for climate modelling studies: PAGES LandCover6K Working Group. Quat. Perspect 222527
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Gero JM, Conkey MW 1991. Engendering Archaeology: Women and Prehistory Oxford, UK/Cambridge, UK: Blackwell
  49. Gifford-Gonzalez D. 1993. Gaps in zooarchaeological analyses of butchery: Is gender an issue?. From Bones to Behavior: Ethnoarchaeological and Experimental Contributions to the Interpretation of Faunal Remains J Hudson 181–99 Carbondale: Cent. Archaeol. Investig., South. Ill. Univ.
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Gifford-Gonzalez D. 2008. Thoughts on a method for zooarchaeological study of daily life. See Montón-Subías & Sánchez-Romero 2008 15–23
  51. Gilbert RI, Mielke JH 1985. The Analysis of Prehistoric Diets Orlando, FL: Acad. Press
  52. Godoy M. 2016. A Navajo chef gives a glimpse inside the makeshift kitchens at Standing Rock. NPR Nov. 5. https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/11/05/499807252/a-navajo-chef-gives-a-glimpse-inside-the-makeshift-kitchens-at-standing-rock
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Gokee C, Logan AL. 2014. Comparing craft and culinary practice in Africa: themes and perspectives. Afr. Archaeol. Rev. 31:87–104
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Goldstein DJ, Shimada I. 2010. Feeding the fire: food and craft production in the Middle Sicán Period (AD 950–1050). See Klarich 2010b 161–89
  55. González-Marcén P, Montón-Subías S, Picazo M 2008. Towards an archaeology of maintenance activities. See Montón-Subías & Sánchez-Romero 2008 3–8
  56. Goody J. 1982. Cooking, Cuisine and Class: A Study in Comparative Sociology Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
  57. Graff SR. 2018. Archaeological studies of cooking and food preparation. J. Archaeol. Res. 26:305–51
    [Google Scholar]
  58. Graff SR, Rodríguez-Alegría E 2012. The Menial Art of Cooking: Archaeological Studies of Cooking and Food Preparation Boulder: Univ. Press Colo.
  59. Greenfield HJ, Bouchnick R. 2011. Kashrut and Shechita—the relationship between dietary practices and ritual slaughtering of animals on Jewish identity. Identity Crisis: Archaeological Perspectives on Social Identity L Amundsen-Meyer, N Engel, S Pickering 106–20 Calgary: Chacmool Archaeol. Assoc.
    [Google Scholar]
  60. Gumerman G IV. 1997. Food and complex societies. J. Archaeol. Method Theory 4:105–39
    [Google Scholar]
  61. Halperin CT. 2017. Ancient cosmopolitanism: feminism and the rethinking of Maya inter-regional interactions during the Late Classic to Postclassic periods (ca. 600–1521 CE). J. Soc. Archaeol. 17:349–75
    [Google Scholar]
  62. Hamilakis Y. 1996. Wine, oil and the dialectics of power in Bronze Age Crete: a review of the evidence. Oxford J. Archaeol. 15:1–32
    [Google Scholar]
  63. Hamilakis Y. 1999. Food technologies/technologies of the body: the social context of wine and oil production and consumption in Bronze Age Crete. World Archaeol 31:38–54
    [Google Scholar]
  64. Hamilakis Y. 2014. Archaeology and the Senses: Human Experience, Memory, and Affect Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
  65. Hamilakis Y. 2016. Decolonial archaeologies: from ethnoarchaeology to archaeological ethnography. World Archaeol 48:678–82
    [Google Scholar]
  66. Hamon C, Le Gall V 2013. Millet and sauce: the uses and functions of querns among the Minyanka (Mali). J. Anthropol. Archaeol. 32:109–21
    [Google Scholar]
  67. Hastorf CA. 1991. Gender, space, and food in prehistory. See Gero & Conkey 1991 132–59
  68. Hastorf CA. 2003. Andean luxury foods: special food for the ancestors, deities and the elite. Antiquity 77:545–54
    [Google Scholar]
  69. Hastorf CA. 2008. Food and feasting, social and political aspects. Encyclopedia of Archaeology DM Pearsall 1386–95 New York: Acad. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  70. Hastorf CA. 2012. The habitus of cooking practices at Neolithic Çatalhöyük. See Graff & Rodríguez-Alegría 2012 65–86
  71. Hastorf CA. 2016. The Social Archaeology of Food: Thinking about Eating from Prehistory to the Present Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
  72. Hayden B, Villeneuve S. 2011. A century of feasting studies. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 40:433–49
    [Google Scholar]
  73. Hegmon M. 2016. Archaeology of the human experience: an introduction. Archaeol. Pap. Am. Anthropol. Assoc. 27:7–21
    [Google Scholar]
  74. Hendon JA. 1996. Archaeological approaches to the organization of domestic labor: household practice and domestic relations. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 25:45–61
    [Google Scholar]
  75. Hendy J, Colonese AC, Franz I, Fernandes R, Fischer R et al. 2018. Ancient proteins from ceramic vessels at Çatalhöyük West reveal the hidden cuisine of early farmers. Nat. Commun. 9:4064
    [Google Scholar]
  76. Heron C, Craig OE, Luquin A, Steele VJ, Thompson A, Piličiauskas G 2015. Cooking fish and drinking milk? Patterns in pottery use in the southeastern Baltic, 3300–2400 cal BC. J. Archaeol. Sci. 63:33–43
    [Google Scholar]
  77. Hopwood M. 2013. Sustenance, taste, and the practice of community in Ancient Mesopotamia. Making Senses of the Past: Toward a Sensory Archaeology J Day 222–42 Carbondale: South. Ill. Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  78. Hruby J. 2008. You are how you eat: Mycenean class and cuisine. DAIS: The Aegean Feast L Hitchcock, R Laffineur, JL Crowley 151–57 Liège, Belg: Univ. Liège
    [Google Scholar]
  79. Ingold T. 1993. The temporality of the landscape. World Archaeol 25:152–74
    [Google Scholar]
  80. Isaakidou V. 2007. Cooking in the labyrinth: exploring ‘cuisine’ at Bronze Age Knossos. See Mee & Renard 2007 5–24
  81. Jaffe Y, Wei Q, Zhao Y 2018. Foodways and the archaeology of colonial contact: rethinking the Western Zhou Expansion in Shandong. Am. Anthropol. 120:55–71
    [Google Scholar]
  82. Jones S. 2009. Food and Gender in Fiji: Ethnoarchaeological Explorations Lanham, MD: Lexington Books
  83. Joyce R, Henderson JS. 2007. From feasting to cuisine: implications of archaeological research in an Early Honduran Village. Am. Anthropol. 109:642–53
    [Google Scholar]
  84. Kelly L. 2012. New flavors for the oldest recipes. Saudi Aramco World 63:38–43
    [Google Scholar]
  85. King SM. 2008. The spatial organization of food sharing in Early Postclassic households: an application of soil chemistry in Ancient Oaxaca, Mexico. J. Archaeol. Sci. 35:1224–39
    [Google Scholar]
  86. Kirch PV, O'Day SJ. 2003. New archaeological insights into food and status: a case study from pre-contact Hawaii. World Archaeol 34:484–97
    [Google Scholar]
  87. Klarich EA. 2010a. Behind the scenes and into the kitchen: new directions for the study of prehistoric meals. See Klarich 2010b 1–15
  88. Klarich EA 2010b. Inside Ancient Kitchens: New Directions in the Study of Daily Meals and Feasts Boulder: Univ. Press Colo.
  89. Leakey RE, Slikkerveer LJ 1991. Origins and Development of Agriculture in East Africa: The Ethnosystems Approach to the Study of Early Food Production in Kenya Iowa City: Iowa State Univ.
  90. Lechtman H. 1977. Style in technology—some early thoughts. Material Culture: Styles, Organization, and Dynamics of Technology H Lechtman, R Merrill 3–20 St. Paul, MN: West
    [Google Scholar]
  91. Lemonnier P 1993. Technological Choices: Transformations in Material Cultures Since the Neolithic London: Routledge
  92. Leroi-Gourhan A. 1993. 1964. Le geste et la parole I & II. [Gesture and Speech], transl. A Bostock Berger Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (from French)
    [Google Scholar]
  93. Lévi-Strauss C. 1997. The culinary triangle. Food and Culture: A Reader C Counihan, P Van Esterik 28–35 New York/London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  94. Logan AL. 2016. An archaeology of food security in Banda. Ghana: Archaeol. Pap. Am. Anthropol. Assoc. 27:106–19
    [Google Scholar]
  95. Logan AL, Cruz MD. 2014. Gendered taskscapes: food, farming, and craft production in Banda, Ghana in the eighteenth to twenty-first centuries. Afr. Archaeol. Rev. 31:203–31
    [Google Scholar]
  96. Lyons D. 2007. Integrating African cuisines: rural cuisine and identity in Tigray, highland Ethiopia. J. Soc. Archaeol. 7:346–71
    [Google Scholar]
  97. Lyons D. 2014. Perceptions of consumption: constituting potters, farmers and blacksmiths in the culinary continuum in Eastern Tigray, Northern Highland Ethiopia. Afr. Archaeol. Rev. 31:169–201
    [Google Scholar]
  98. Lyons D, Casey J. 2016. It's a material world: the critical and on-going value of ethnoarchaeology in understanding variation, change and materiality. World Archaeol 48:609–27
    [Google Scholar]
  99. MacLean R, Insoll T. 1999. The social context of food technology in Iron Age Gao, Mali. World Archaeol 31:78–92
    [Google Scholar]
  100. Mauss M. 2000. The Gift. The Form and Reason for Exchange in Archaic Societies New York: Norton
  101. McGovern PE. 2000. The funerary banquet of ‘King Midas’. Expedition Magazine 42:21–29
    [Google Scholar]
  102. McGovern PE. 2017. Ancient Brews Rediscovered and Recreated New York/London: Norton
  103. McGovern PE, Hall GR. 2015. Charting a future course for organic residue analysis in archaeology. J. Archaeol. Method Theory 23:592–622
    [Google Scholar]
  104. Mee C, Renard J 2007. Cooking Up the Past: Food and Culinary Practices in the Neolithic and Bronze Age Aegean Oxford, UK: Oxbow
  105. Mejia P. 2017. The grim food served on 17th-century sea voyages wasn't all bad. Atlas Obscura Novemb. 8. https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/ship-food-research-recreation-beer
    [Google Scholar]
  106. Mills BJ. 2008. Colonialism and cuisine: cultural transformation, agency, and history at Zuni Pueblo. Cultural Transmission and Material Culture: Breaking Down Boundaries MT Stark, BJ Bowser, L Horne 245–62 Tucson: Univ. Ariz. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  107. Minkoff MF. 2017. Domestic labour in black and green: deciphering the sensory experiences of African-American and Irish domestics working in Alexandria, Virginia. Atlantic Crossing in the Wake of Frederick Douglass: Archaeology, Literature, and Spatial Culture M Leone, LM Jenkins 83–103 Leiden, Neth./Boston: Brill
    [Google Scholar]
  108. Mintz SW, Du Bois CM 2002. The anthropology of food and eating. Annu. Rev. Anthropol. 31:99–119
    [Google Scholar]
  109. Monaco F. 2019. The old school kitchen. Tavola Mediterranea https://tavolamediterranea.com/category/the-old-school-kitchen/
    [Google Scholar]
  110. Monroe JC, Janzen A. 2014. The Dahomean feast: royal women, private politics, and culinary practices in Atlantic West Africa. Afr. Archaeol. Rev. 31:299–337
    [Google Scholar]
  111. Montón Subías S. 2002. Cooking in zooarchaeology: Is this issue still raw?. Consuming Passions and Patterns of Consumption P Miracle, N Milner 7–16 Cambridge, UK: McDonald Inst. Archaeol. Res.
    [Google Scholar]
  112. Montón Subías S, Sánchez-Romero M 2008. Engendering Social Dynamics: The Archaeology of Maintenance Activities BAR Int. Ser Oxford, UK: Archaeopress
  113. Morrison JE. 2018. Experience ancient flavors from the land, sea and sky of Crete. Minoan Tastes https://www.minoantastes.com/
    [Google Scholar]
  114. Morrison JE, Sofianou C, Brogan TM, Alyounis J, Mylona D 2015. Cooking up new perspectives for Late Minoan IB domestic activities: an experimental approach to understanding the possibilities and probabilities of using ancient cooking pots. See Spataro & Villing 2015 115–24
  115. Morrison KD. 2016. From millets to rice (and back again?): cuisine, cultivation, and health in Southern India. A Companion to South Asia in the Past GR Schug, SR Walimbe 358–73 Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell
    [Google Scholar]
  116. Novak SA. 2014. [Wo]man and beast: skeletal signatures of a starvation diet. An Archaeology of Desperation: Exploring the Donner Party's Alder Creek Camp KJ Dixon, JM Schablitsky, SA Novak 185–218 Oklahoma: Univ. Okla. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  117. O'Conner A. 2010. Maya foodways: a reflection of gender and ideology. Pre-Columbian Foodways: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Food, Culture, and Markets in Ancient Mesoamerica JE Staller, M Carrasco 487–510 Berlin: Springer
    [Google Scholar]
  118. Parker Pearson M. 2003. Food, identity and culture: an introduction and overview. Food, Culture and Identity in the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age M Parker Pearson 1–30 Oxford, UK: Archaeopress
    [Google Scholar]
  119. Patania I, Jaffe Y. 2018. Eating archaeology: experimenting with food in public outreach. Public Archaeol 17:55–68
    [Google Scholar]
  120. Pearsall DM, Chandler-Ezell K, Zeidler JA 2004. Maize in ancient Ecuador: results of residue analysis of stone tools from the Real Alto site. J. Archaeol. Sci. 31:423–42
    [Google Scholar]
  121. Pecci A, Gabrieli RS, Inserra F, Cau MA, Waksman SY 2015. Preliminary results of the organic residue analysis of 13th century cooking wares from a household in Frankish Paphos (Cyprus). Sci. Technol. Archaeol. Res. 1:99–105
    [Google Scholar]
  122. Perruchini E, Glatz C, Hald MM, Casana J, Toney JL 2018. Revealing invisible brews: a new approach to the chemical identification of ancient beer. J. Archaeol. Sci. 100:176–90
    [Google Scholar]
  123. Pezzarossi G, Kennedy R, Law H 2012. “Hoe cake and pickerel”: cooking traditions, community, and agency at a nineteenth-century Nipmuc farmstead. See Graff & Rodríguez-Alegría 2012 201–29
  124. Pollock S. 2012. Between feasts and daily meals. Towards an archaeology of commensal spaces. eTopoi Spec. Vol. 2
    [Google Scholar]
  125. Potter JM, Ortman SG. 2004. Community and cuisine in the Prehispanic American Southwest. Identity, Feasting, and the Archaeology of the Greater Southwest: Proceedings of the 2002 Southwest Symposium BJ Mills 173–91 Boulder: Univ. Press Colo.
    [Google Scholar]
  126. Primavera M, Heiss AG, Valamoti MS, Quarta G, Masieri M, Fiorentino G 2019. Inside sacrificial cakes: plant components and production processes of food offerings at the Demeter and Persephone sanctuary of Monte Papalucio (Oria, southern Italy). Archaeol. Anthropol. Sci. 11:1273–87
    [Google Scholar]
  127. Redding R. 2014. Status and diet at the workers’ town, Giza, Egypt. Anthropological Approaches to Zooarchaeology: Colonialism, Complexity and Animal Transformations DV Campana 65–75 Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books
    [Google Scholar]
  128. Restelli FB. 2015. Hearth and home. Interpreting fire installations at Arslantepe, Eastern Turkey, from the fourth to the beginning of the second millennium BCE. Paléorient 41:127–51
    [Google Scholar]
  129. Rodríguez-Alegría E. 2012. From grinding corn to dishing out money: a long-term history of cooking in Xaltocan, Mexico. See Graff & Rodríguez-Alegría 2012 99–118
  130. Rodríguez-Alegría E, Graff SR. 2012. Introduction. The menial art of cooking. See Graff & Rodríguez-Alegría 2012 1–18
  131. Roffet-Salque M, Dunne J, Altoft DT, Casanova E, Cramp LJE et al. 2007. From the inside out: upscaling organic residue analyses of archaeological ceramics. J. Archaeol. Sci. Rep. 16:627–40
    [Google Scholar]
  132. Roumpou M, Psaraki K, Aravantinos V, Heron C 2007. Early Bronze Age cooking vessels from Thebes: organic residue analysis and archaeological implications. See Mee & Renard 2007 158–73
  133. Rowan E. 2019. The sensory experiences of food consumption. The Routledge Handbook of Sensory Archaeology R Skeates, J Day 293–314 London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  134. Russell N, Bogaard A. 2010. Subsistence actions at Çatalhöyük. Agency and Identity in the Ancient Near East: New Paths Forward SR Steadman, JC Ross 63–79 London: Equinox
    [Google Scholar]
  135. Russell N, Martin L. 2012. Cooking meat and bones at Neolithic Çatalhöyük. See Graff & Rodríguez-Alegría 2012 87–98
  136. Saul H, Glykou A, Craig OE 2014. Stewing on a theme of cuisine: biomolecular and interpretive approaches to culinary changes at the transition to agriculture. Early Farmers: The View from Archaeology and Science A Whittle, P Bickle 197–213 Oxford, UK: Univ. Press Sch.
    [Google Scholar]
  137. Scaramelli KTD, Scaramelli F. 2012. Cooking for fame or fortune: the effect of European contact on casabe production in the Orinoco. See Graff & Rodríguez-Alegría 2012 119–44
  138. Sharma M. 2019. How to eat dinner like the last citizens of Pompeii. New York Times Magazine Dec. 24. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/23/t-magazine/heston-blumenthal-pompeii-dinner.html
    [Google Scholar]
  139. Singleton T. 2015. Slavery Behind The Wall: An Archaeology of a Cuban Coffee Plantation Gainesville: Univ. Press Fla.
  140. Smith ST. 2003. Pharaohs, feasts, and foreigners: cooking, foodways, and agency on Ancient Egypt's southern frontier. See Bray 2003a 39–64
  141. Spataro M, Villing A 2015. Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Science of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books
  142. Spielmann KA, Aggarwal RM. 2017. Household- versus national-scale food storage. Perspectives on food security from archaeology and contemporary India. The Give and Take of Sustainability: Archaeological and Anthropological Perspectives on Tradeoffs M Hegmon 244–71 Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  143. Stahl AB. 1989. Plant-food processing: implications for dietary quality. Foraging and Farming: The Evolution of Plant Exploitation DR Harris, GC Hillman 171–94 London: Unwin Hyman
    [Google Scholar]
  144. Stahl AB. 2014. Intersections of craft and cuisine: implications for what and how we study. Afr. Archaeol. Rev. 31:383–93
    [Google Scholar]
  145. Stein G. 2012. Food preparation, social context, and ethnicity in a prehistoric Mesopotamian colony. See Graff & Rodríguez-Alegría 2012 47–64
  146. Sunseri CK. 2015. Food politics of alliance in a California frontier Chinatown. Int. J. Hist. Archaeol. 19:416–31
    [Google Scholar]
  147. Sutton D. 2016. The anthropology of cooking. The Handbook of Food and Anthropology JA Klein, JL Watson 349–69 London/New York: Bloomsbury Acad.
    [Google Scholar]
  148. Thomas RM. 2007. Food and the maintenance of social boundaries in Medieval England. The Archaeology of Food and Identity KC Twiss 130–51 Carbondale: South. Ill. Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  149. Thoms AV. 2008. The fire stones carry: ethnographic records and archaeological expectations for hot-rock cookery in western North America. J. Anthropol. Archaeol. 27:443–60
    [Google Scholar]
  150. Twiss KC. 2012. The archaeology of food and social diversity. J. Archaeol. Res. 20:357–95
    [Google Scholar]
  151. Twiss KC. 2019. The Archaeology of Food: Identity, Politics, and Ideology in the Prehistoric and Historic Past Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
  152. Urem-Kotsou D, Kotsakis K. 2007. Pottery, cuisine and community in the Neolithic of north Greece. See Mee & Renard 2007 225–46
  153. Valenzuela-Lamas S, Valenzuela-Suau L, Saula O, Colet A, Mercadal O et al. 2014. Shechita and Kashrut: identifying Jewish populations through zooarchaeology and taphonomy. Two examples from Medieval Catalonia (North-Eastern Spain). Quat. Int. 330:109–17
    [Google Scholar]
  154. VanDerwarker AM, Wilson GD. 2015. The Archaeology of Food and Warfare: Food Insecurity in Prehistory Berlin: Springer Int.
  155. Wandsnider L. 1997. The roasted and the boiled: food composition and heat treatment with special emphasis on pit-hearth cooking. J. Anthropol. Archaeol. 16:1–48
    [Google Scholar]
  156. Wells EC. 2004. Investigating activity patterns in Prehispanic plazas: weak acid-extraction ICP-AES analysis of anthrosols at Classic Period El Coyote, Northwestern Honduras. Archaeometry 46:67–84
    [Google Scholar]
  157. Winther-Jacobsen K. 2015. Cooking wares between the Hellenistic and Roman world: artefact variability, technological choice and practice. See Spataro & Villing 2015 91–102
  158. Wrangham R. 2017. Control of fire in the Paleolithic. Evaluating the cooking hypothesis. Curr. Anthropol. 58:S303–13
    [Google Scholar]
  159. Zhang JG. 2019. A conversation with the team that made bread with Ancient Egyptian yeast: how a scientist harvested 4,500-year-old yeast and turned it into a loaf of sourdough. Eater Aug. 8. https://www.eater.com/2019/8/8/20792134/interview-seamus-blackley-serena-love-richard-bowman-baked-bread-ancient-egyptian-yeast
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-anthro-102317-045734
Loading
  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error