1932

Abstract

Energy-coupling factor (ECF)–type ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters catalyze membrane transport of micronutrients in prokaryotes. Crystal structures and biochemical characterization have revealed that ECF transporters are mechanistically distinct from other ABC transport systems. Notably, ECF transporters make use of small integral membrane subunits (S-components) that are predicted to topple over in the membrane when carrying the bound substrate from the extracellular side of the bilayer to the cytosol. Here, we review the phylogenetic diversity of ECF transporters as well as recent structural and biochemical advancements that have led to the postulation of conceptually different mechanistic models. These models can be described as power stroke and thermal ratchet. Structural data indicate that the lipid composition and bilayer structure are likely to have great impact on the transport function. We argue that study of ECF transporters could lead to generic insight into membrane protein structure, dynamics, and interaction.

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2019-06-20
2024-06-18
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