1932

Abstract

The process of aging manifests from a highly interconnected network of biological cascades resulting in the degradation and breakdown of every living organism over time. This natural development increases risk for numerous diseases and can be debilitating. Academic and industrial investigators have long sought to impede, or potentially reverse, aging in the hopes of alleviating clinical burden, restoring functionality, and promoting longevity. Despite widespread investigation, identifying impactful therapeutics has been hindered by narrow experimental validation and the lack of rigorous study design. In this review, we explore the current understanding of the biological mechanisms of aging and how this understanding both informs and limits interpreting data from experimental models based on these mechanisms. We also discuss select therapeutic strategies that have yielded promising data in these model systems with potential clinical translation. Lastly, we propose a unifying approach needed to rigorously vet current and future therapeutics and guide evaluation toward efficacious therapies.

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2023-06-08
2024-06-15
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