1932

Abstract

This review summarizes current knowledge of synaptic proteins that are central to synaptic vesicle fusion in presynaptic active zones, including SNAREs (oluble -ethylmaleimide sensitive factor ttachment protein ceptors), synaptotagmin, complexin, Munc18 (mammalian uncoordinated-18), and Munc13 (mammalian uncoordinated-13), and highlights recent insights in the cooperation of these proteins for neurotransmitter release. Structural and functional studies of the synaptic fusion machinery suggest new molecular models of synaptic vesicle priming and Ca2+-triggered fusion. These studies will be a stepping-stone toward answering the question of how the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery achieves such high speed and sensitivity.

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2018-05-20
2024-04-24
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