1932

Abstract

Macromolecule–drug conjugates (MDCs) occupy a critical niche in modern pharmaceuticals that deals with the assembly and combination of a macromolecular carrier, a drug cargo, and a linker toward the creation of effective therapeutics. Macromolecular carriers such as synthetic biocompatible polymers and proteins are often exploited for their inherent ability to improve drug circulation, prevent off-target drug cytotoxicity, and widen the therapeutic index of drugs. One of the most significant challenges in MDC design involves tuning their drug release kinetics to achieve high spatiotemporal precision. This level of control requires a thorough qualitative and quantitative understanding of the bond cleavage event. In this review, we highlight specific research findings that emphasize the importance of establishing a precise structure–function relationship for MDCs that can be used to predict their bond cleavage and drug release kinetic parameters.

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2021-06-07
2024-05-20
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