1932

Abstract

Commons—resources used or governed by groups of heterogeneous users through agreed-upon institutional arrangements—are the subject of one of the more successful research programs in the social-environmental sciences. This review assesses research on the commons to accomplish three tasks. First, it surveys the theoretical, substantive, and methods-focused achievements of the field, illustrating how commons research has also influenced natural resource policy making. Second, it examines the changing trajectories of commons research, emphasizing the growing interest of commons researchers in new methods and the application of insights to new social contexts. Third, the review suggests that research on the commons can find continuing relevance by addressing contemporary and future social-environmental challenges. It highlights three directions in particular: () strengthening the focus on issues of power and equity, () applying insights about effective commons governance to collaborative attempts to craft commons in new societal spaces, and () advancing an emerging emphasis on causal analysis and taking advantage of novel streams of large-scale public datasets.

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2023-11-13
2024-04-25
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