1932

Abstract

Monocytes are innate blood cells that maintain vascular homeostasis and are early responders to pathogens in acute infections. There are three well-characterized classes of monocytes: classical (CD14+CD16 in humans and Ly6Chi in mice), intermediate (CD14+CD16+ in humans and Ly6C+Treml4+ in mice), and nonclassical (CD14CD16+ in humans and Ly6Clo in mice). Classical monocytes are critical for the initial inflammatory response. Classical monocytes can differentiate into macrophages in tissue and can contribute to chronic disease. Nonclassical monocytes have been widely viewed as anti-inflammatory, as they maintain vascular homeostasis. They are a first line of defense in recognition and clearance of pathogens. However, their roles in chronic disease are less clear. They have been shown to be protective as well as positively associated with disease burden. This review focuses on the state of the monocyte biology field and the functions of monocytes, particularly nonclassical monocytes, in health and disease.

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2019-04-26
2024-04-14
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