1932

Abstract

Each of us is a story. Mine is a story of doing science for 60 years, and I am honored to be asked to tell it. Even though this autobiography was written for the , I have chosen to describe my whole career in science because the segment that was immunology is so intertwined with all else I was doing. This article is an elongation and modification of a talk I gave at my 80th birthday celebration at Caltech on March 23, 2018.

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2019-04-26
2024-04-16
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