1932

Abstract

Antibodies have been used to prevent or treat viral infections since the nineteenth century, but the full potential to use passive immunization for infectious diseases has yet to be realized. The advent of efficient methods for isolating broad and potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies is enabling us to develop antibodies with unprecedented activities. The discovery of IgG Fc region modifications that extend antibody half-life in humans to three months or more suggests that antibodies could become the principal tool with which we manage future viral epidemics. Antibodies for members of most virus families that cause severe disease in humans have been isolated, and many of them are in clinical development, an area that has accelerated during the effort to prevent or treat COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). Broad and potently neutralizing antibodies are also important research reagents for identification of protective epitopes that can be engineered into active vaccines through structure-based reverse vaccinology.

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2022-04-26
2024-04-16
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