1932

Abstract

Infection with causes >1.5 million deaths worldwide annually. Innate immune cells are the first to encounter , and their response dictates the course of infection. Dendritic cells (DCs) activate the adaptive response and determine its characteristics. Macrophages are responsible both for exerting cell-intrinsic antimicrobial control and for initiating and maintaining inflammation. The inflammatory response to infection is a double-edged sword. While cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1 are important for protection, either excessive or insufficient cytokine production results in progressive disease. Furthermore, neutrophils—cells normally associated with control of bacterial infection—are emerging as key drivers of a hyperinflammatory response that results in host mortality. The roles of other innate cells, including natural killer cells and innate-like T cells, remain enigmatic. Understanding the nuances of both cell-intrinsic control of infection and regulation of inflammation will be crucial for the successful development of host-targeted therapeutics and vaccines.

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2021-04-26
2024-07-17
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