1932

Abstract

I've had serious misgivings about writing this article, because from living the experience day by day, it's hard to believe my accomplishments merit the attention. To skirt this roadblock, I forced myself to pretend I was in a conversation with my trainees, trying to distill the central driving forces of my career in science. The below chronicles my evolution from would-be astronaut/ballerina to budding developmental biologist to devoted T cell immunologist. It traces my work from a focus on intrathymic events that mold developing T cells into self–major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted lymphocytes to extrathymic events that fine-tune the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and impose the finishing touches on T cell maturation. It is a story of a few personal attributes multiplied by generous mentors, good luck, hard work, perseverance, and knowing when to step down.

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2022-04-26
2024-04-14
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