1932

Abstract

Among antibodies, IgA is unique because it has evolved to be secreted onto mucosal surfaces. The structure of IgA and the associated secretory component allow IgA to survive the highly proteolytic environment of mucosal surfaces but also substantially limit IgA's ability to activate effector functions on immune cells. Despite these characteristics, IgA is critical for both preventing enteric infections and shaping the local microbiome. IgA's function is determined by a distinct antigen-binding repertoire, composed of antibodies with a variety of specificities, from permissive polyspecificity to cross-reactivity to exquisite specificity to a single epitope, which act together to regulate intestinal bacteria. Development of the unique function and specificities of IgA is shaped by local cues provided by the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, driven by the constantly changing environment of the intestine and microbiota.

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2021-04-26
2024-05-29
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