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Abstract

Militant organizations and rebel groups are an enduring feature of political life in much of the world. As scholars pay greater attention to rebel governance strategies, the role of law and courts is coming to the fore. We observe a good deal of variation across rebel groups in terms of their legal infrastructure and its organizational differentiation. This article surveys the recent literature and develops a framework for understanding why rebel groups vary in their use of law and also explores the consequences of legal governance for subject populations, for rebels themselves, and for external actors.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-lawsocsci-101518-042753
2019-10-13
2024-06-20
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