1932

Abstract

Although numerous trials have convincingly shown benefits of statin therapy in both primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), most showed relative risk reductions of 25–40%, and thus many individuals continue to have ASCVD events despite statin therapy. Substantial progress has been made in developing therapies that address the residual risk for ASCVD despite statin therapy. In this review, we summarize progress of currently available therapies along with therapies under development that further reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B–containing lipoproteins, reduce lipoprotein(a), reduce ASCVD events in patients with high triglycerides, and directly target inflammation to reduce ASCVD risk.

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2021-01-27
2024-04-15
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