1932

Abstract

Influenza viruses remain a severe burden to human health because of their contribution to overall morbidity and mortality. Current seasonal influenza virus vaccines do not provide sufficient protection to alleviate the annual impact of influenza and cannot confer protection against potentially pandemic influenza viruses. The lack of protection is due to rapid changes of the viral epitopes targeted by the vaccine and the often suboptimal immunogenicity of current immunization strategies. Major efforts to improve vaccination approaches are under way. The development of a universal influenza virus vaccine may be possible by combining the lessons learned from redirecting the immune response toward conserved viral epitopes, as well as the use of adjuvants and novel vaccination platforms.

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2020-01-27
2024-06-17
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