1932

Abstract

Fungal-mediated disease progression and antifungal drug efficacy are significantly impacted by the dynamic infection microenvironment. At the site of infection, oxygen often becomes limiting and induces a hypoxia response in both the fungal pathogen and host cells. The fungal hypoxia response impacts several important aspects of fungal biology that contribute to pathogenesis, virulence, antifungal drug susceptibility, and ultimately infection outcomes. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of the hypoxia response in the most common human fungal pathogens, discuss potential therapeutic opportunities, and highlight important areas for future research.

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2023-09-15
2024-04-23
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