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Abstract

The modern cochlear implant (CI) is the most successful neural prosthesis developed to date. CIs provide hearing to the profoundly hearing impaired and allow the acquisition of spoken language in children born deaf. Results from studies enabled by the CI have provided new insights into () minimal representations at the periphery for speech reception, () brain mechanisms for decoding speech presented in quiet and in acoustically adverse conditions, () the developmental neuroscience of language and hearing, and () the mechanisms and time courses of intramodal and cross-modal plasticity. Additionally, the results have underscored the interconnectedness of brain functions and the importance of top-down processes in perception and learning. The findings are described in this review with emphasis on the developing brain and the acquisition of hearing and spoken language.

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2019-07-08
2024-07-23
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