1932

Abstract

The original description of dietary methionine restriction (MR) used semipurified diets to limit methionine intake to 20% of normal levels, and this reduction in dietary methionine increased longevity by ∼30% in rats. The MR diet also produces paradoxical increases in energy intake and expenditure and limits fat deposition while reducing tissue and circulating lipids and enhancing overall insulin sensitivity. In the years following the original 1993 report, a comprehensive effort has been made to understand the nutrient sensing and signaling systems linking reduced dietary methionine to the behavioral, physiological, biochemical, and transcriptional components of the response. Recent work has shown that transcriptional activation of hepatic fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a key event linking the MR diet to many but not all components of its metabolic phenotype. These findings raise the interesting possibility of developing therapeutic, MR-based diets that produce the beneficial effects of FGF21 by nutritionally modulating its transcription and release.

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2022-08-22
2024-06-17
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