1932

Abstract

Metal exposure is pervasive and not limited to sporadic poisoning events or toxic waste sites. Hundreds of millions of people around the globe are affected by chronic metal exposure, which is associated with serious health concerns, including cancer, as demonstrated in a variety of studies at the molecular, systemic, and epidemiologic levels. Metal-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity are sophisticated and complex in nature. This review provides a broad context and holistic view of currently available studies on the mechanisms of metal-induced carcinogenesis. Specifically, we focus on the five most prevalent carcinogenic metals, arsenic, nickel, cadmium, chromium, and beryllium, and their potential to drive carcinogenesis in humans. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms behind the development of metal-induced cancer can provide valuable insights for therapeutic intervention involving molecular targets in metal-induced carcinogenesis.

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2019-01-06
2024-04-20
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