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Abstract

The coordinated movement of organic anions (e.g., drugs, metabolites, signaling molecules, nutrients, antioxidants, gut microbiome products) between tissues and body fluids depends, in large part, on organic anion transporters (OATs) [solute carrier 22 (SLC22)], organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) [solute carrier organic (SLCO)], and multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) [ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C (ABCC)]. Depending on the range of substrates, transporters in these families can be considered multispecific, oligospecific, or (relatively) monospecific. Systems biology analyses of these transporters in the context of expression patterns reveal they are hubs in networks involved in interorgan and interorganismal communication. The remote sensing and signaling theory explains how the coordinated functions of drug transporters, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and regulatory proteins play a role in optimizing systemic and local levels of important endogenous small molecules. We focus on the role of OATs, OATPs, and MRPs in endogenous metabolism and how their substrates (e.g., bile acids, short chain fatty acids, urate, uremic toxins) mediate interorgan and interorganismal communication and help maintain and restore homeostasis in healthy and disease states.

Keyword(s): ABCC2ABCC4ABCG2BCRPMRP2MRP4OAT1OAT3OATP1B1OATP1B3SLC22A6SLC22A8SLCO1B1SLCO1B3
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-pharmtox-030322-084058
2023-01-20
2024-04-17
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