1932

Abstract

Inflammation and its timely resolution are critical to ensure effective host defense and appropriate tissue repair after injury and or infection. Chronic, unresolved inflammation typifies many prevalent pathologies. The key mediators that initiate and drive the inflammatory response are well defined and targeted by conventional anti-inflammatory therapeutics. More recently, there is a growing appreciation that specific mediators, including arachidonate-derived lipoxins, are generated in self-limiting inflammatory responses to promote the resolution of inflammation and endogenous repair mechanisms without compromising host defense. We discuss the proresolving biological actions of lipoxins and recent efforts to harness their therapeutic potential through the development of novel, potent lipoxin mimetics generated via efficient, modular stereoselective synthetic pathways. We consider the evidence that lipoxin mimetics may have applications in limiting inflammation and reversing fibrosis and the underlying mechanisms.

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2023-01-20
2024-04-20
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-pharmtox-051921-085407
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