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Abstract

Chemical manifestations of strong light–matter coupling have recently been a subject of intense experimental and theoretical studies. Here we review the present status of this field. Section 1 is an introduction to molecular polaritonics and to collective response aspects of light–matter interactions. Section 2 provides an overview of the key experimental observations of these effects, while Section 3 describes our current theoretical understanding of the effect of strong light–matter coupling on chemical dynamics. A brief outline of applications to energy conversion processes is given in Section 4. Pending technical issues in the construction of theoretical approaches are briefly described in Section 5. Finally, the summary in Section 6 outlines the paths ahead in this exciting endeavor.

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2022-04-20
2024-05-29
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