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Abstract

Physical inactivity is one of the leading health problems in the world. Strong epidemiological and clinical evidence demonstrates that exercise decreases the risk of more than 35 different disorders and that exercise should be prescribed as medicine for many chronic diseases. The physiology and molecular biology of exercise suggests that exercise activates multiple signaling pathways of major health importance. An anti-inflammatory environment is produced with each bout of exercise, and long-term anti-inflammatory effects are mediated via an effect on abdominal adiposity. There is, however, a need to close the gap between knowledge and practice and assure that basic research is translated, implemented, and anchored in society, leading to change of praxis and political statements. In order to make more people move, we need a true translational perspective on exercise as medicine, from molecular and physiological events to infrastructure and architecture, with direct implications for clinical practice and public health.

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2019-02-10
2024-04-13
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