1932

Abstract

Viral nanotechnology exploits the prefabricated nanostructures of viruses, which are already abundant in nature. With well-defined molecular architectures, viral nanocarriers offer unprecedented opportunities for precise structural and functional manipulation using genetic engineering and/or bio-orthogonal chemistries. In this manner, they can be loaded with diverse molecular payloads for targeted delivery. Mammalian viruses are already established in the clinic for gene therapy and immunotherapy, and inactivated viruses or virus-like particles have long been used as vaccines. More recently, plant viruses and bacteriophages have been developed as nanocarriers for diagnostic imaging, vaccine and drug delivery, and combined diagnosis/therapy (theranostics). The first wave of these novel virus-based tools has completed clinical development and is poised to make an impact on clinical practice.

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2020-09-29
2024-04-16
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