1932

Abstract

Major advances in our understanding of plant viral genome expression strategies and the interaction of a virus with its host for replication and movement, induction of disease, and resistance responses have been made through the generation of infectious molecules from cloned viral sequences. Autonomously replicating viral vectors derived from infectious clones have been exploited to express foreign genes in plants. Applications of virus-based vectors include the production of human/animal therapeutic proteins in plant cells and the specific study of plant biochemical processes, including those that confer resistance to pathogens. Additionally, virus-induced gene silencing, which is RNA mediated and triggered through homology-dependent RNA degradation mechanisms, has been exploited as an efficient method to study the functions of host genes in plants and to deliver small RNAs to insects. New and exciting strategies for vector engineering, delivery, and applications of plant virus–based vectors are the subject of this review.

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2020-09-29
2024-06-13
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