1932

Abstract

Viral diseases provide a major challenge to twenty-first century agriculture worldwide. Climate change and human population pressures are driving rapid alterations in agricultural practices and cropping systems that favor destructive viral disease outbreaks. Such outbreaks are strikingly apparent in subsistence agriculture in food-insecure regions. Agricultural globalization and international trade are spreading viruses and their vectors to new geographical regions with unexpected consequences for food production and natural ecosystems. Due to the varying epidemiological characteristics of diverent viral pathosystems, there is no one-size-fits-all approach toward mitigating negative viral disease impacts on diverse agroecological production systems. Advances in scientific understanding of virus pathosystems, rapid technological innovation, innovative communication strategies, and global scientific networks provide opportunities to build epidemiologic intelligence of virus threats to crop production and global food security. A paradigm shift toward deploying integrated, smart, and eco-friendly strategies is required to advance virus disease management in diverse agricultural cropping systems.

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2019-09-29
2024-04-21
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