1932

Abstract

RNA turnover and processing in bacteria are governed by the structurally divergent but functionally convergent RNA degradosome, and the mechanisms have been researched extensively in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. An emerging research field focuses on how bacterial viruses hijack all aspects of the bacterial metabolism, including the host machinery of RNA metabolism. This review addresses research on phage-based influence on RNA turnover, which can act either indirectly or via dedicated effector molecules that target degradosome assemblies. The structural divergence of host RNA turnover mechanisms likely explains the limited number of phage proteins directly targeting these specialized, host-specific complexes. The unique and nonconserved structure of DIP, a phage-encoded inhibitor of the degradosome, illustrates this hypothesis. However, the natural occurrence of phage-encoded mechanisms regulating RNA turnover indicates a clear evolutionary benefit for this mode of host manipulation. Further exploration of the viral dark matter of unknown phage proteins may reveal more structurally novel interference strategies that, in turn, could be exploited for biotechnological applications.

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2019-09-29
2024-06-21
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