1932

Abstract

DNA viruses are linked to many infectious diseases and contribute significantly to human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Moreover, DNA viral infections are usually lifelong and hard to eradicate. Under certain circumstances, these viruses can cause fatal disease, especially in children and immunocompromised patients. An efficient innate immune response against these viruses is critical, not only as the first line of host defense against viral infection but also for mounting more specific and robust adaptive immunity against the virus. Recognition of the viral DNA genome is the very first step of this whole process and is crucial for understanding viral pathogenesis as well as for preventing and treating DNA virus–associated diseases. This review focuses on the current state of our knowledge on how human DNA viruses are sensed by the host innate immune system and how viral proteins counteract this immune response.

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2018-09-29
2024-04-14
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