1932

Abstract

(CTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of citrus. During the past century, CTV induced grave epidemics in citrus-growing areas worldwide that have resulted in a loss of more than 100 million trees. At present, the virus continues to threaten citrus production in many different countries. Research on CTV is accompanied by distinctive challenges stemming from the large size of its RNA genome, the narrow host range limited to slow-growing species and relatives, and the complexity of CTV populations. Despite these hurdles, remarkable progress has been made in understanding the CTV-host interactions and in converting the virus into a tool for crop protection and improvement. This review focuses on recent advances that have shed light on the mechanisms underlying CTV infection. Understanding these mechanisms is pivotal for the development of means to control CTV diseases and, ultimately, turn this virus into an ally.

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2022-09-29
2024-06-17
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