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Abstract

Abstract

Genome trees are a means to capture the overwhelming amount of phylogenetic information that is present in genomes. Different formalisms have been introduced to reconstruct genome trees on the basis of various aspects of the genome. On the basis of these aspects, we separate genome trees into five classes: () alignment-free trees based on statistic properties of the genome, () gene content trees based on the presence and absence of genes, () trees based on chromosomal gene order, () trees based on average sequence similarity, and () phylogenomics-based genome trees. Despite their recent development, genome tree methods have already had some impact on the phylogenetic classification of bacterial species. However, their main impact so far has been on our understanding of the nature of genome evolution and the role of horizontal gene transfer therein. An ideal genome tree method should be capable of using all gene families, including those containing paralogs, in a phylogenomics framework capitalizing on existing methods in conventional phylogenetic reconstruction. We expect such sophisticated methods to help us resolve the branching order between the main bacterial phyla.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.micro.59.030804.121233
2005-10-13
2024-06-14
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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