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Abstract

Heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are key regulators of a multitude of signaling pathways in all eukaryotes. Although the core G-protein components and their basic biochemistries are broadly conserved throughout evolution, the regulatory mechanisms of G proteins seem to have been rewired in plants to meet specific needs. These proteins are currently the focus of intense research in plants due to their involvement in many agronomically important traits, such as seed yield, organ size regulation, biotic and abiotic stress responses, symbiosis, and nitrogen use efficiency. The availability of massive sequence information from a variety of plant species, extensive biochemical data generated over decades, and impressive genetic resources for plant G proteins have made it possible to examine their role, unique properties, and novel regulation. This review focuses on some recent advances in our understanding of the mechanistic details of this critical signaling pathway to enable the precise manipulation and generation of plants to meet future needs.

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2019-04-29
2024-04-13
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