1932

Abstract

There is intense interest in using genome editing technologies to domesticate wild plants, or accelerate the improvement of weakly domesticated crops, in de novo domestication. Here, we discuss promising genetic strategies, with a focus on plant development. Importantly, genome editing releases us from dependence on random mutagenesis or intraspecific diversity, allowing us to draw solutions more broadly from diversity. However, sparse understanding of the complex genetics of diversity limits innovation. Beyond genetics, we urge the ethical use of indigenous knowledge, indigenous plants, and ethnobotany. De novo domestication still requires conventional breeding by phenotypic selection, especially in the development of crops for diverse environments and cultures. Indeed, uniting genome editing with selective breeding could facilitate faster and better outcomes than either technology alone. Domestication is complex and incompletely understood, involving changes to many aspects of plant biology and human culture. Success in de novo domestication requires careful attention to history and collaboration across traditional boundaries.

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2023-05-22
2024-04-23
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