1932

Abstract

The promotive effect of auxin on shoot cell expansion provided the bioassay used to isolate this central plant hormone nearly a century ago. While the mechanisms underlying auxin perception and signaling to regulate transcription have largely been elucidated, how auxin controls cell expansion is only now attaining molecular-level definition. The good news is that the decades-old acid growth theory invoking plasma membrane H+-ATPase activation is still useful. The better news is that a mechanistic framework has emerged, wherein Small Auxin Up RNA (SAUR) proteins regulate protein phosphatases to control H+-ATPase activity. In this review, we focus on rapid auxin effects, their relationship to H+-ATPase activation and other transporters, and dependence on TIR1/AFB signaling. We also discuss how some observations, such as near-instantaneous effects on ion transport and root growth, do not fit into a single, comprehensive explanation of how auxin controls cell expansion, and where more research is warranted.

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2020-04-29
2024-04-24
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