1932

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) encompass a collection of intricately linked chemical entities characterized by individually distinct physicochemical properties and biological reactivities. Although excessive ROS generation is well known to underpin disease development, it has become increasingly evident that ROS also play central roles in redox regulation and normal physiology. A major challenge in uncovering the relevant biological mechanisms and deconvoluting the apparently paradoxical roles of distinct ROS in human health and disease lies in the selective and sensitive detection of these transient species in the complex biological milieu. Small-molecule-based fluorescent sensors enable molecular imaging of ROS with great spatial and temporal resolution and have thus been appreciated as excellent tools for aiding discoveries in modern redox biology. We review a selection of state-of-the-art sensors with demonstrated utility in biological systems. By providing a systematic overview based on underlying chemical sensing mechanisms, we wish to highlight the strengths and weaknesses in prior sensor works and propose some guiding principles for the development of future probes.

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2019-06-20
2024-06-22
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