1932

Abstract

The brain, as one of the most lipid-rich organs, heavily relies on lipid transport and distribution to maintain homeostasis and neuronal function. Lipid transport mediated by lipoprotein particles, which are complex structures composed of apolipoproteins and lipids, has been thoroughly characterized in the periphery. Although lipoproteins in the central nervous system (CNS) were reported over half a century ago, the identification of as the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease has accelerated investigation of the biology and pathobiology of lipoproteins in the CNS. This review provides an overview of the different components of lipoprotein particles, in particular apolipoproteins, and their involvements in both physiological functions and pathological mechanisms in the CNS.

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2022-06-21
2024-06-17
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