1932

Abstract

The persistence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in increasingly disruptive impacts, and it has become the most devastating challenge to global health in a century. The rapid emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants challenges the currently available therapeutics for clinical application. Nonstructural proteins (also known as replicase proteins) with versatile biological functions play central roles in viral replication and transcription inside the host cells, and they are the most conserved target proteins among the SARS-CoV-2 variants. Specifically, they constitute the replication–transcription complexes (RTCs) dominating the synthesis of viral RNA. Knowledge of themolecular mechanisms of nonstructural proteins and their assembly into RTCs will benefit the development of antivirals targeting them against existing or potentially emerging variants. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the structures and functions of coronavirus nonstructural proteins as well as the assembly and functions of RTCs in the life cycle of the virus.

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2022-06-21
2024-06-21
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-biochem-052521-115653
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