1932

Abstract

Bifactor and other hierarchical models have become central to representing and explaining observations in psychopathology, health, and other areas of clinical science, as well as in the behavioral sciences more broadly. This prominence comes after a relatively rapid period of rediscovery, however, and certain features remain poorly understood. Here, hierarchical models are compared and contrasted with other models of superordinate structure, with a focus on implications for model comparisons and interpretation. Issues pertaining to the specification and estimation of bifactor and other hierarchical models are reviewed in exploratory as well as confirmatory modeling scenarios, as are emerging findings about model fit and selection. Bifactor and other hierarchical models provide a powerful mechanism for parsing shared and unique components of variance, but care is required in specifying and making inferences about them.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-050718-095522
2019-05-07
2024-04-20
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