1932

Abstract

The aggressive and rule-breaking behaviors that constitute youth antisocial behavior (ASB) are shaped by intertwined genetic, developmental, familial, spatial, temporal, cultural, interpersonal, and contextual influences operating across multiple levels of analysis. Genetic influences on ASB, for example, manifest in different ways during different developmental periods, and do so in part as a function of exposure to harsh parenting, delinquent peers, and disadvantaged neighborhoods. There is also clear evidence documenting societal effects, time-period effects, sex-assigned-at-birth effects, and cohort effects, all of which point to prominent (and possibly interconnected) cultural influences on ASB. In short, ASB is shaped by individuals’ current and prior environmental experiences, genetic risks, and the time and place in which they live. This review seeks to illuminate already documented instances of interplay among the multilevel etiologic forces impinging on youth ASB, with the goal of facilitating additional research.

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2022-05-09
2024-06-14
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