1932

Abstract

Is the field of cognitive aging irretrievably concerned with decline and deficits, or is it shifting to emphasize the hope of preservation and enhancement of cognitive function in late life? A fragment of an answer comes from research attempting to understand the reasons for individual variability in the extent and rate of cognitive decline. This body of work has created a sense of optimism based on evidence that there are some health behaviors that amplify cognitive performance or mitigate the rate of age-related cognitive decline. In this context, we discuss the role of physical activity on neurocognitive function in late adulthood and summarize how it can be conceptualized as a constructive approach both for the maintenance of cognitive function and as a therapeutic for enhancing or optimizing cognitive function in late life. In this way, physical activity research can be used to shape perceptions of cognitive aging.

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2022-05-09
2024-04-19
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