1932

Abstract

This review provides a critical overview of Indigenous peoples’ interactions with criminal justice systems. It focuses on the experiences of Indigenous peoples residing in the four major Anglo-settler-colonial jurisdictions of Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. The review is built around a number of key arguments, including that centuries of colonization have left Indigenous peoples across all four jurisdictions in a position of profound social, economic, and political marginalization; that the colonial project, especially the socioeconomic marginalization resulting from it, plays a significant role in the contemporary over-representation of Indigenous peoples in settler-colonial criminal justice systems; and that a key failure of both governments and the academy has been to disregard Indigenous peoples responses to social harm and to rely too heavily on Western theorizing, policy, and practice to solve the problem of Indigenous over-representation. Finally, we argue that little will change to reduce the negative nature of Indigenous–criminal justice interactions until the settler-colonial state and the discipline of criminology show a willingness to support Indigenous peoples’ desire for self-determination and for leadership in the response to the social harms that impact their communities.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-criminol-011518-024630
2019-01-13
2024-04-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/criminol/2/1/annurev-criminol-011518-024630.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-criminol-011518-024630&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Literature Cited

  1. Aborig. Torres Strait Isl. Soc. Justice Comm. (ATSISJC). 1993. Social Justice Report 1993 Sydney: Aust. Hum. Rights Comm.
  2. Aborig. Torres Strait Isl. Soc. Justice Comm. (ATSISJC). 2008. Social Justice Report 2008 Sydney: Aust. Hum. Rights Comm.
  3. Aborig. Torres Strait Isl. Soc. Justice Comm. (ATSISJC). 2011. Social Justice Report 2011 Sydney: Aust. Hum. Rights Comm.
  4. Agozino B 2003. Counter-Colonial Criminology: A Critique of Imperialist Reason London: Pluto Press
  5. Agozino B 2004. Imperialism, crime and criminology: towards the decolonisation of criminology. Crime Law Soc. Change 41:343–58
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Agozino B 2007. Power: an African fractal theory of chaos, crime, violence and healing Paper presented at the Salises Annual Conference, University of West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago, March 26
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Agozino B 2010. What is criminology? A control freak discipline! Afr. J.Criminol. . Justice Stud 4:1i–xx
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Aust. Bur. Stat. (ABS). 2013. Estimates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians June 2011. Rep. 3238.0.55.001 Aust. Bur. Stat Canberra:
  9. Aust. Bur. Stat. (ABS). 2017. Prisoners in Australia, 2017 Rep. 4517.0 Aust. Bur. Stat Canberra:
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Battiste M, Henderson J 2000. Protecting Indigenous Knowledge and Heritage: A Global Challenge Saskatoon, Sask: Purich Publ.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Blagg H 2002. Aboriginal Community Patrols Research Project Perth, WA: Dep. Indig. Aff.
  12. Blagg H 2008. Crime, Aboriginality and the Decolonisation of Justice Leichhardt: Hawkins Press
  13. Bogues A 2005. Working outside criticism: thinking beyond limits. Boundary 2:71–93
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Borrows J 2010. Canada's Indigenous Constitution Toronto: Univ. Toronto Press
  15. Boyce J 2016. Victimization of Aboriginal People in Canada, 2014 Rep., Stat. Can Ottawa: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2016001/article/14631-eng.htm
  16. Carjuzza J, Ruff WG 2010. When Western epistemology and an Indigenous worldview meet: culturally responsive assessment in practice. J. Sch. Teach. Learn. 10:168–79
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Carson EA 2018. Prisoners in 2016 Bur. Justice Stat. Rep. NCJ 251149, US Dep. Justice Washington, DC: https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/p16.pdf
  18. Castro-Gomez S 2002. The social sciences, epistemic violence, and the problem of the “invention of the other.”. Nepantla Views South 3:2269–85
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Clayworth P 2014. Prisons. Te Ara Encycl. N. Z. http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/prisons/
  20. Comm. Labor Public Welf. 1969. Indian Education: A National Tragedy–A National Challenge. Washington, DC: US Gov. Print. Off.
  21. Cornell S 2015. Wolves have a constitution: continuities in Indigenous self-government. Int. Indig. Policy J. 6:11–20
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Coyle M 2010. Notes on the study of language: towards critical race criminology. West. Criminol. Rev. 11:111–19
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Cunneen C 2005. Consensus and sovereignty: rethinking policing in the light of Indigenous self-determination. Unfinished Constitutional Business? Rethinking Indigenous Self-determination B Hocking 47–60 Canberra: Aborig. Stud. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Cunneen C 2011. Indigeneity, sovereignty and the law: challenging the processes of criminalisation. South Atlantic Q 110:2309–23
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Cunneen C 2017.a Police violence: the case of Indigenous Australians. The Wiley Handbook on Violence and Aggression P Sturmey 1591–1602 Hoboken, NJ: Wiley
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Cunneen C 2017.b Visual power and sovereignty: Indigenous art and colonialism. The Routledge International Handbook of Visual Criminology M Brown, E Carrabine 376–88 Milton Park: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Cunneen C, Rowe S 2014. Decolonising Indigenous victimization. Crime, Victims and Policy D. Wilson, S. Ross 10–32 London: Palgrave McMillan
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Cunneen C, Rowe S, Tauri J 2016. Fracturing the colonial paradigm: Indigenous epistemologies and methodologies. Method(e)s Afr. Rev. Soc. Sci. Methodol. Spec. Issue Epistem. Fract. Glob. World 2:1–262–78
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Cunneen C, Tauri J 2016. Indigenous Criminology Bristol: Policy Press
  30. Deckert A 2014. Neo-colonial criminology: quantifying the silence. Afr. J. Criminol. Justice Stud. 8:139–60
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Deckert A 2016. Criminologists, duct tape, and indigenous people: quantifying the use of silencing research methods. Int. J. Comp. Appl. Crim. Justice 40:143–62
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Denzin NK, Lincoln YS 2008. Introduction. Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies NK Denzin, YS Lincoln, LT Smith 1–20 London: Sage
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Denzin NK, Lincoln YS, Smith LT 2008. Handbook of Critical and Indigenous Methodologies London: Sage
  34. Dep. Correct. 2017. Prison Facts and Statistics 2017 Wellington, NZ: Dep. Correct.
  35. Devi S 2011. Native American health left out in the cold. Lancet 3771:1481–82
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Dunbar-Ortiz R 2014. An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States Boston: Beacon Press
  37. Dziedzic A, McMillan M 2016. Australian Indigenous constitutions: recognition and renewal. Federal Law Rev 44:337–361
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Foucault M 1977. Discipline and Punish New York: Vantage
  39. Guarino-Ghezzi S 2002. Criminology as moral philosophy: an essay on Richard Quinney's bearing witness to crime and social justice. Contemp. Justice Rev. 5:4399–402
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Haebich A 1992. For Their Own Good: Aborigines and Government in the South West of Western Australia 1900–1940 Perth: Univ. West. Aust. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Haebich A 2000. Broken Circles. Fragmenting Indigenous Families 1800–2000 Freemantle: Freemantle Arts Cent. Press
  42. Hamilton A, Sinclair M 1991. Report of the Aboriginal justice inquiry of Manitoba: the justice system and Aboriginal people Rep., Aborig. Justice Implement. Comm Winnipeg, Manit: http://www.ajic.mb.ca/volumel/toc.html
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Hart MA 2010. Indigenous worldviews, knowledge, and research: the development of an indigenous research paradigm. J. Indig. Voices Soc. Work 1:11–16
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Hixson L, Hepler B, Kim M 2012. The Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Population: 2010 Washington, DC: US Census Bur.
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Indep. Police Conduct Auth. (IPCA). 2012. Thematic Report: Deaths in Custody—A Ten Year Review Wellington, NZ: IPCA
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Indian Law Order Comm. 2013. A roadmap for making Native America Safer: report to the President and Congress of the United States Rep., Indian Law Order Comm Washington, DC: http://www.aisc.ucla.edu/iloc/report/
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Indig. North. Aff. Can. 2010. Statement of Apology to Former Students of Indian Residential Schools Ottawa: Indig. North. Aff. Can.
  48. Jackson M 1988. Maori and the Criminal Justice System: He Whaipaanga Hou: A New Perspective Wellington, NZ: Dep. Justice
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Jeffries S, Stenning P 2014. Sentencing Aboriginal offenders: law, policy and practice in three countries. Can. J. Criminol. Crim. Justice 56:4447–94
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Jones C 2014. A Maori constitutional tradition. N. Z. J. Public Int. Law 12:1187–204
    [Google Scholar]
  51. Johnston E 1991. Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody National Report Canberra: Aust. Gov. Publ. Serv.
  52. Kovach M 2009. Indigenous Methodologies: Characteristics, Conversations, and Contexts Toronto: Univ. Toronto Press
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Lithopoulos S 2007. International Comparison of Indigenous Policing Models Ottawa: Public Saf. Can.
  54. Louis RP 2007. Can you hear us now? Voices from the margin: using indigenous methodologies in geographic research. Geogr. Res. 45:2130–39
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Macartney S, Bishaw A, Fontenot K 2013. Poverty rates for selected detailed race and hispanic groups by state and place: 2007–2011 Rep. ACSBR/11-17, US Census Bureau Washington, DC:
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Males M 2014. Who are police killing? Rep., Cent. Juv. Crim. Justice Washington, DC: http://www.cjcj.org/news/8113
  57. Marie D 2010. Māori and criminal offending: a critical appraisal. Aust. N. Z. J. Criminol. 43:2283–300
    [Google Scholar]
  58. Marriot L, Sim D 2014. Indicators of inequality for Maori and Pacific people Work. Pap. IV, Victoria Univ Wellington, NZ:
  59. Martin FA 2014. The coverage of American Indians and Alaskan Natives in criminal justice and criminology introductory textbooks. Crit. Criminol. 22:237–56
    [Google Scholar]
  60. McIntosh T 2014. Reflections of being “in” institutions. Cult.Stud. Rev. 20:1343–47
    [Google Scholar]
  61. Meriam L 1928. The Problem of Indian Administration Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Press
  62. Messerschmidt J 1986. Capitalism, Patriarchy, and Crime: Towards a Socialist Feminist Criminology Totowa, NJ: Rowman & Littlefield
    [Google Scholar]
  63. Milloy J 1999. A National Crime. The Canadian Government and the Residential School System 1879 to 1986 Winnipeg, Manit: Univ. Manit. Press
  64. Minist. Justice. 2015. 2014 New Zealand crime and safety survey: main findings Rep., Minist. Justice Wellington, NZ: https://www.justice.govt.nz/assets/Documents/Publications/NZCASS-201602-Main-Findings-Report-Updated.pdf
    [Google Scholar]
  65. Minnich E 1990. Transforming Knowledge Philadelphia: Temple Press
  66. Moreton-Robinson A 2000. Talkin’ Up to the White Woman: Indigenous Women and Feminism St Lucia, Qld.: Univ. Qld. Press
  67. Moreton-Robinson A 2015. The White Possessive. Property, Power and Indigenous Sovereignty Minneapolis, MN: Univ. Minn. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  68. Moreton-Robinson A, Walter M 2009. Indigenous methodologies in social research. Social Research Methods M. Walter 1–18 South Melbourne: Oxford. , 2nd ed..
    [Google Scholar]
  69. Moreton-Robinson A, Walter M 2011. Leadership in Indigenous Research Capacity Building: Implementing and Embedding an Indigenous Research Methodologies Masterclass Module Sydney: Aust. Learn. Teach. Counc.
    [Google Scholar]
  70. Moyle P, Tauri J 2016. Maori, family group conferencing and the mystifications of restorative justice. Vict. Offenders 11:1–20
    [Google Scholar]
  71. Natl. Inq. Sep. Aborig. Torres Strait Isl. Child. Fam. (NISATSIC). 1997. Bringing Them Home: Report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families Sydney: Hum. Rights Equal Oppo. Comm.
    [Google Scholar]
  72. Newbold G, Jeffries S 2010. Race, crime and criminal justice in Australia and New Zealand. Race, Crime and the Criminal Justice System: International Perspectives A Kalunta-Crumpton 187–206 Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan
    [Google Scholar]
  73. N. Z. Courts Consult. Comm. 1991. Report of the Courts Consultative Committee on He Whaipaanga Hou Wellington, NZ: Dep. Justice
  74. Noonan J 2003. Critical Humanism and the Politics of Difference Montreal: McGill-Queens Univ. Press
  75. Norris T, Vines P, Hoel E 2012. The American Indian and Alaska Native Population: 2010 Washington, DC: US Census Bur.
    [Google Scholar]
  76. Palys T, Victor W 2007. Getting to a better place: Qwi:qwelstóm, the Stó:lo and self-determination. Indigenous Legal Traditions Law Comm. Can 12–39 Vancouver, Can: UBC Press
    [Google Scholar]
  77. Perry B 2013. Household Incomes in New Zealand: Trends in Indicators of Inequality and Hardship 1982–2012 Wellington, NZ: Minist. Soc. Dev.
    [Google Scholar]
  78. Perry S 2004. American Indians and crime. A BJS statistical profile, 1992–2002 Bur. Justice Stat. Rep. NCJ 203097, US Dep. Justice Washington, DC:
    [Google Scholar]
  79. Porsanger J 2004. An essay about Indigenous methodology. Nordlit 15:105–20 http://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/nordlit/article/viewFile/1910/1776
    [Google Scholar]
  80. Public Saf. Can. 2013. Corrections and conditional release statistical overview. 2013 annual report Rep., Public Works Gov. Serv. Can Ottawa: https://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/ccrso-2013/index-en.aspx
    [Google Scholar]
  81. R. Comm. Aborig. Peoples (RCAP). 1996. Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples Vol. 1. Rep., Minist Supply Serv. Can Ottawa:
  82. Reitano J 2017. Adult Correctional Statistics in Canada 2015/2016 Ottawa: Stat. Can http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2017001/article/14700-eng.htm
  83. Rigney L 1999. Internationalisation of an Indigenous anticolonial cultural critique of research methodologies: a guide to indigenist research methodology and its principles. Wicazo Sa Rev 14:2109–121
    [Google Scholar]
  84. Roy E 2017. New Zealand river granted same legal rights as human being. The Guardian March 16. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/mar/16/new-zealand-river-granted-same-legal-rights-as-human-being
  85. Ruggiero V 2000. Crime and Markets: Essays in Anti-Criminology Oxford, UK: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  86. Said E 1996. Representations of the Intellectual New York: Vintage Books
  87. Sakala L 2014. Breaking Down Mass Incarceration in the 2010 Census: State-by-State Incarceration Rates by Race/Ethnicity Northampton: Prison Policy Init.
    [Google Scholar]
  88. Scheurich JJ, Young MD 1997. Coloring epistemologies: Are our research epistemologies racially biased?. Educ. Res. 26:44–16
    [Google Scholar]
  89. Schneider C 2003. Integrating critical race theory and postmodernism: implications of race, class and gender. Crit. Criminol. 12:87–103
    [Google Scholar]
  90. Smith A 2004. Boarding school abuses, human rights, and reparations. Soc. Justice 31:489–102
    [Google Scholar]
  91. Smith A 2005. Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide Brooklyn: South End Press
  92. Smith A 2007. Soul Wound: The Legacy of Native American Schools New York: Amnesty Int.
    [Google Scholar]
  93. Smith LT 1999. Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples London: Zed Books.
  94. Smith LT 2005. On tricky ground: researching the native in the age of uncertainty. The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research NK Denzin, YS Lincoln 85–107 Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE. , 3rd ed..
    [Google Scholar]
  95. Stat. Can. 2011. Aboriginal peoples in Canada: First Nations people, Metis and Inuit Natl. Househ. Surv. Rep. 99–011-X2011001, Stat. Can Ottawa:
    [Google Scholar]
  96. Stat. N. Z 2013. 2013 Census: Quick Stats about Maori Wellington, NZ: Stat. N. Z.
    [Google Scholar]
  97. Steer. Comm. Rev. Gov. Serv. Provis. (SCROGSP). 2014. Overcoming Indigenous disadvantage—key indicators 2014 Rep., Product. Comm., Melbourne
  98. Steer. Comm. Rev. Gov. Serv. Provis. (SCROGSP). 2016. Overcoming Indigenous disadvantage—key indicators 2016 Rep., Product. Comm Melbourne:
  99. Tauri J 2005. Indigenous perspectives. Introduction to Criminological Thought R Walters, T Bradley 129–45 Auckland, NZ: Pearson Longman
  100. Tauri J 2009. The Māori social science academy and evidence-based policy. MAI Rev 1:1–11
    [Google Scholar]
  101. Tauri J 2011. Crime control policy and First Nations: a critical commentary on current trends and issues in settler societies Keynote paper presented at the Aboriginal Justice Conference, Penticton, BC
    [Google Scholar]
  102. Tauri J 2012.a Indigenous critique of authoritarian criminology. Crime, Justice and Social Democracy: International Perspectives K Carrington, M Ball, E O'Brien, J Tauri 217–33 London: Palgrave Macmillan
    [Google Scholar]
  103. Tauri J 2012.b Empowering indigenous justice in a neo-colonial context Paper presented at 68th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Criminology Chicago:
  104. Tauri J 2014. Settler colonialism, criminal justice and indigenous peoples. Afr. J. Criminol. Justice Stud. 8:120–37
    [Google Scholar]
  105. Tauri J 2015.a A comment on the epistemic violence of white academic privilege – part 2. The Indigenous Criminologist Blog Jan 8. http://juantauri.blogspot.com/2015/01/a-comment-on-epistemic-violence-of.html
  106. Tauri J 2015.b Breaking the criminal justice-criminology nexus, empowering Indigenous communities. The Indigenous Criminologist Blog March 7. http://juantauri.blogspot.com/2015/03/breaking-criminal-justice-criminology.html
  107. Tauri J 2016. The state, the academy and Indigenous justice: a counter-colonial critique PhD Thesis, Univ. Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW
    [Google Scholar]
  108. Tauri J 2017. Indigenous peoples and the globalisation of crime control. Soc. Justice 43:46–67
    [Google Scholar]
  109. Tauri J, Webb R 2012. A critical appraisal of responses to Māori offending. Int. Indig. Policy J. 3:41–16
    [Google Scholar]
  110. Toussaint S 1995. Western Australia. Contested Ground A McGrath 240–68 Sydney: Allen and Unwin
    [Google Scholar]
  111. Truth Reconcil. Comm. Can. (TRCC). 2012.a Interim Report Winnipeg, Manit: Truth Reconcil. Comm. Can.
  112. Truth Reconcil. Comm. Can. (TRCC). 2012.b Backgrounder Winnipeg, Manit: Truth Reconcil. Comm. Can.
  113. Victor W 2007. Indigenous justice: clearing space and place for Indigenous epistemologies Res. Pap., Natl. Cent. Indig. Peoples Gov Canberra, Aust.:
    [Google Scholar]
  114. Walter M 2010. The politics of the data: how the Australian statistical Indigene is constructed. Int. J. Crit. Indig. Stud. 3:245–56
    [Google Scholar]
  115. Walter M 2016. Indigenous peoples, research and ethics. Engaging with Ethics in International Criminological Research M Adorjan, R Ricciardelli 87–105 London: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  116. Walter M, Andersen C 2013. Indigenous Statistics: A Quantitative Methodology Los Angeles: Left Coast Press
  117. Weatherburn D 2010. Guest editorial: Indigenous violence. Aust. N. Z. J. Criminol. 3:2197–198
    [Google Scholar]
  118. Weatherburn D 2014. Arresting Incarceration: Pathways Out of Indigenous Imprisonment Canberra: Aborig. Stud. Press
  119. Wootten H 1991. Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, regional report of inquiry in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania Canberra: Aust. Gov. Publ. Serv.
    [Google Scholar]
  120. Workman K, McIntosh T 2013. Crime, punishment and poverty. Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis M Rashbrooke 120–13 Wellington, NZ: Bridget Williams Books
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-criminol-011518-024630
Loading
  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error