1932

Abstract

Big data is changing every corner of economics and finance. The largest firms in the US economy are valued chiefly for their data. Yet, these data are largely excluded from macroeconomic and finance research. We review work and relevant tools for measuring economic activity, market power, data markets, and the role of data in financial markets. We also highlight areas where future work is needed.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-economics-082322-023244
2023-09-13
2024-06-20
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