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Abstract

The Global Genomic Medicine Collaborative, a multinational coalition of genomic and policy experts working to implement genomics in clinical care, considers pharmacogenomics to be among the first areas in genomic medicine that can provide guidance in routine clinical practice, by linking genetic variation and drug response. Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe life-threatening reactions to medications with a high incidence worldwide. Genomic screening prior to drug administration is a key opportunity and potential paradigm for using genomic medicine to reduce morbidity and mortality and ultimately eliminate one of the most devastating adverse drug reactions. This review focuses on the current understanding of the surveillance, pathogenesis, and treatment of SJS/TEN, including the role of genomics and pharmacogenomics in the etiology, treatment, and eradication of preventable causes of drug-induced SJS/TEN. Gaps, unmet needs, and priorities for future research have been identified for the optimal management of drug-induced SJS/TEN in various ethnic populations. Pharmacogenomics holds great promise for optimal patient stratification and theranostics, yet its clinical implementation needs to be cost-effective and sustainable.

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2018-08-31
2024-06-24
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-genom-083115-022324
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