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Abstract

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that affects multiple organ systems due to an inactivating variant in either or , resulting in the hyperactivation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Dysregulated mTOR signaling results in increased cell growth and proliferation. Clinically, TSC patients exhibit great phenotypic variability, but the neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations of the disease have the greatest morbidity and mortality. TSC-associated epilepsy occurs in nearly all patients and is often difficult to treat because it is refractory to multiple antiseizure medications. The advent of mTOR inhibitors offers great promise in the treatment of TSC-associated epilepsy and other neurodevelopmental manifestations of the disease; however, the optimal timing of therapeutic intervention is not yet fully understood.

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2019-08-31
2024-04-22
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