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Abstract

Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are immune cells that lack a specific antigen receptor yet can produce an array of effector cytokines that in variety match that of T helper cell subsets. ILCs function in lymphoid organogenesis, tissue remodeling, antimicrobial immunity, and inflammation, particularly at barrier surfaces. Their ability to promptly respond to insults inflicted by stress-causing microbes strongly suggests that ILCs are critical in first-line immunological defenses. Here, we review current data on developmental requirements, lineage relationships, and effector functions of two families of ILCs: () Rorγt-expressing cells involved in lymphoid tissue formation, mucosal immunity, and inflammation and () type 2 ILCs that are important for helminth immunity. We also discuss the potential roles of ILCs in the pathology of immune-mediated inflammatory and infectious diseases including allergy.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-immunol-020711-075053
2012-04-23
2024-05-18
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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