1932

Abstract

Metabolism is one of the strongest drivers of interkingdom interactions—including those between microorganisms and their multicellular hosts. Traditionally thought to fuel energy requirements and provide building blocks for biosynthetic pathways, metabolism is now appreciated for its role in providing metabolites, small-molecule intermediates generated from metabolic processes, to perform various regulatory functions to mediate symbiotic relationships between microbes and their hosts. Here, we review recent advances in our mechanistic understanding of how microbiota-derived metabolites orchestrate and support physiological responses in the host, including immunity, inflammation, defense against infections, and metabolism. Understanding how microbes metabolically communicate with their hosts will provide us an opportunity to better describe how a host interacts with all microbes—beneficial, pathogenic, and commensal—and an opportunity to discover new ways to treat microbial-driven diseases.

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2020-04-26
2024-05-22
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