1932

Abstract

Innate lymphocyte populations are emerging as key effectors in tissue homeostasis, microbial defense, and inflammatory skin disease. The cells are evolutionarily ancient and carry conserved principles of function, which can be achieved through shared or unique specific mechanisms. Recent technological and treatment advances have provided insight into heterogeneity within and between individuals and species. Similar pathways can extend through to adaptive lymphocytes, which softens the margins with innate lymphocyte populations and allows investigation of nonredundant pathways of immunity and inflammation that might be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Here, we review advances in understanding of innate lymphocyte biology with a focus on skin disease and the roles of commensal and pathogen responses and tissue homeostasis.

Keyword(s): innatelymphocytesskin
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-immunol-082919-093554
2020-04-26
2024-06-22
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