1932

Abstract

Tissue-resident macrophages are present in most tissues with developmental, self-renewal, or functional attributes that do not easily fit into a textbook picture of a plastic and multifunctional macrophage originating from hematopoietic stem cells; nor does it fit a pro- versus anti-inflammatory paradigm. This review presents and discusses current knowledge on the developmental biology of macrophages from an evolutionary perspective focused on the function of macrophages, which may aid in study of developmental, inflammatory, tumoral, and degenerative diseases. We also propose a framework to investigate the functions of macrophages in vivo and discuss how inherited germline and somatic mutations may contribute to the roles of macrophages in diseases.

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2021-04-26
2024-06-22
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