1932

Abstract

Foxp3-expressing CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play key roles in the prevention of autoimmunity and the maintenance of immune homeostasis and represent a major barrier to the induction of robust antitumor immune responses. Thus, a clear understanding of the mechanisms coordinating Treg cell differentiation is crucial for understanding numerous facets of health and disease and for developing approaches to modulate Treg cells for clinical benefit. Here, we discuss current knowledge of the signals that coordinate Treg cell development, the antigen-presenting cell types that direct Treg cell selection, and the nature of endogenous Treg cell ligands, focusing on evidence from studies in mice. We also highlight recent advances in this area and identify key unanswered questions.

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2020-04-26
2024-06-12
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