1932

Abstract

Invasive fungal diseases are rare in individuals with intact immunity. This, together with the fact that there are only a few species that account for most mycotic diseases, implies a remarkable natural resistance to pathogenic fungi. Mammalian immunity to fungi rests on two pillars, powerful immune mechanisms and elevated temperatures that create a thermal restriction zone for most fungal species. Conditions associated with increased susceptibility generally reflect major disturbances of immune function involving both the cellular and humoral innate and adaptive arms, which implies considerable redundancy in host defense mechanisms against fungi. In general, tissue fungal invasion is controlled through either neutrophil or granulomatous inflammation, depending on the fungal species. Neutrophils are critical against spp. and spp. while macrophages are essential for controlling mycoses due to spp., spp., and other fungi. The increasing number of immunocompromised patients together with climate change could significantly increase the prevalence of fungal diseases.

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2022-04-26
2024-04-15
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