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Abstract

Intracellular pathogens pose a significant threat to animals. In defense, innate immune sensors attempt to detect these pathogens using pattern recognition receptors that either directly detect microbial molecules or indirectly detect their pathogenic activity. These sensors trigger different forms of regulated cell death, including pyroptosis, apoptosis, and necroptosis, which eliminate the infected host cell niche while simultaneously promoting beneficial immune responses. These defenses force intracellular pathogens to evolve strategies to minimize or completely evade the sensors. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the cytosolic pattern recognition receptors that drive cell death, including NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRP6, NLRP9, NLRC4, AIM2, IFI16, and ZBP1.

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2022-04-26
2024-06-13
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-immunol-101320-011235
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